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Sony 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 SAM DT Standard Zoom Lens for Sony Alpha Digital SLR Cameras (Discontinued by Manufacturer)

Sony 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 SAM DT Standard Zoom Lens for Sony Alpha Digital SLR Cameras (Discontinued by Manufacturer)

Sony 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 SAM DT Standard Zoom Lens for Sony Alpha Digital SLR Cameras (Discontinued by Manufacturer)

  • Small size, light weight standard zoom lens
  • 35mm focal length equivelant on APS-C; 27-82.5mm
  • Smooth and silent AF operation with built-in motor (SAM)
  • Closest focus distance: 0.25m; Maximum magnification: 0.34x
  • Please note: DT lenses are not recommended for use with the DSLR-A900

This superb standard zoom lens for your ? (alpha) DSLR camera has a smooth and silent AF operation with built-in Smooth Autofocus Motor (SAM) to handle the full range of your most common shots. In 35mm equivalent, it covers wide-angle 27mm to 82.5mm midrange for snapshots, portraits, interiors and more. An excellent all-around lens. Please note: DT lenses are not recommended for use with the DSLR-A900.

List Price: $ 179.96

Price: $ 189.95

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3 Comments
  1. Reply
    Philip August 5, 2016 at 8:02 pm
    29 of 29 people found the following review helpful
    4.0 out of 5 stars
    Better than ezra… no, expected. That’s it. Better than expected!, September 25, 2010
    By 
    Philip

    This review is from: Sony 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 SAM DT Standard Zoom Lens for Sony Alpha Digital SLR Cameras (Discontinued by Manufacturer) (Electronics)
    I got this lens after my Sony 18-200 died. I got it so I’d have a wide zoom to carry me until I get something with more range, like an 18-250 or 16-105. I haven’t had this lens long, but no one else has reviewed it, so what the hey. I can always edit the review later if my opinions change.

    I wasn’t expecting a whole lot; this is the base kit lens, after all. I have to say, I’m pleasantly surprised. It’s all plastic construction is exactly what you’d expect for a lens at this price, but it still feels like a well-made lens. If you’re going to be printing a lot of 20″x30″ posters, you might not be able to do much shooting at the widest apertures. Use smaller apertures, and you should be okay. But if you plan to do 8″x10″s and smaller, or just look at them on a computer screen, the image quality from this lens should be fine, even wide open. I’ve tried to get it to show some chromatic aberration, but so far it hasn’t had a bit of it; ever shot has been free of fringing. A pleasant surprise.

    The low ease of use score is primarily because of the rotating front element; change focus, and your polarizing filter adjustment just got “readjusted.” Also, the Auto Focus/Manual Focus switch on the lens is a bit redundant. I had previously said that in order to go from AF to MF, you’ve got to use both the switch on the lens, and the switch on the camera. Turns out that isn’t true; you can leave the camera body in AF, and use the lens switch to go from AF to Manual Focus. But still, why have two switches? I grant you, this is a pretty minor nitpick. What isn’t a minor nitpick is that using the AF/MF button (not the switch on the front of the body, the button on the back) on the higher end Sony bodies (A700 and A900 for example – I don’t know about the 850 or 77) does not decouple the AF mechanism in the lens. This means you may damage the focus gears in the lens if you leave the lens in AF and then focus manually while pressing the AF/MF button on the camera body.

    The low features score comes from the total lack of focus ring distance markings, and that the lens is shortest at 35mm, not 18mm. As you can see in the sample photos, the flare control in this lens could be better. Bokeh, the unfocused parts of a shot, is okay, but not great. This is generally important for portraits, or closeups where only a small portion of the shot is in focus. Other photographers are far more likely to notice the mediocre bokeh of this lens than non-photographers. This is listed as a ‘SAM’ lens, which stands for Smooth Autofocus Motor. This is a motor built into the lens itself, which usually makes for faster, quieter focusing. This works very well in Sony lenses marked SSM (Super Sonic wave Motor), like the 70-300G. On this lens, the in-lens motor doesn’t really do much. I don’t see/hear much difference between this SAM lens and my old 18-200, which uses a motor built into the camera body. The best unexpected feature of this lens is the close focus distance; another pleasant surprise. It’s the best of any lens I’ve ever used; see the ant in the sample photos for one example. The lens says the minimum focus distance is 0.25m/0.82′, but it seems even shorter than that.

    All in all, this is a great first lens, especially if you are new to DSLRs. It would be good for landscapes, reasonable for portraits, and fun for closeups. It doesn’t go to long enough focal lengths for wildlife or anything that needs… longer focal lengths, but this lens is a great value. Depending on what kind of photos you do, this and a longer zoom or a fast prime might be all you need for quite some time. Some obvious lenses to step up from this lens would be
    * the Sony 18-250 or 16-105, depending on how much you want long zoom range.
    * the Sony 11-18 or Tamron 10-24, which will give you even wider shots for landscapes.
    * the Tamron 17-50 F2.8, which will be sharper and faster, but you might not like the bokeh quite as much at times.
    But all of these cost many times more than this 18-55. For what it costs, and the image quality and close focus distance, I could see myself buying another if/when this one meets it’s end. That’s quite a statement for a kit zoom.

    Edit; my default walkaround (a Sony 16-105, very good lens) died an untimely, kinetic death on the Great Wall of China, so I ended up relying on the 18-55 for the rest of the trip, which was about two weeks. This confirmed my high opinion of this lens. If setting it to 18mm put it at it’s shortest overall length, and the focus ring didn’t turn, I might stick with it as a regular walkaround. It gave some impressively sharp shots, stopped down a bit. I might worry about durability, but as cheaply as you can buy this lens, just keep a spare on hand. Trust me, having a spare walkaround zoom on hand is a good idea. If you’re curious, I replaced it with a Tamron 17-50 F2.8, which is an outstanding lens.

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  2. Reply
    andy8400 August 5, 2016 at 8:56 pm
    12 of 13 people found the following review helpful
    4.0 out of 5 stars
    Good kit lens with one flaw, October 28, 2010
    By 
    andy8400 (Chicago) –

    This review is from: Sony 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 SAM DT Standard Zoom Lens for Sony Alpha Digital SLR Cameras (Discontinued by Manufacturer) (Electronics)
    The general expectations for for a lightweight kit lens were met for the most part… especially size and weight. Although most inexpensive lenses show some problems at one range extreme or another, this one had noticeable sharpness degradation at max zoom (55mm) AND at minimum stop (5.6). Sharpness improves somewhat even at small increments such as 6.3 (better yet if higher). OR at 45-50 mm, also wide open. So only at the extreme, 55mm at f5.6, was there an obvious drop in performance.

    Therefore if you are shooting on a darker day or early evening at maximum zoom and the camera chooses f5.6, just switch to Aperture Priority and set your f-stop to 6.3 or higher if light allows, and sharpness will resume. This lens is sharp enough for general use at virtually ANY OTHER COMBINATION of settings. I will check this against another unit to determine whether my lens may be defective but with this lens’ small dimensions, it’s unlikely.

    I wish cameras had settings to limit the ranges of lens parameters for use in Program Mode much in the same way that my Nikon can be set for minimum and maximum ISO levels. Maybe some do but mine don’t unfortunately.

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  3. Reply
    JuniorJC August 5, 2016 at 9:40 pm
    5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Great value lens, July 28, 2011
    By 

    This review is from: Sony 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 SAM DT Standard Zoom Lens for Sony Alpha Digital SLR Cameras (Discontinued by Manufacturer) (Electronics)
    This kit lens was included with my camera body. The lens is constructed in plastic which may look cheap, but really cuts down on the weight. I can walk around with 3 lenses in my bag and still run lighter than my friends with a Nikon or Canon camera and just one lens. The 18-55 is a short-range zoom but I have a 55-200 lens in case I want to get closer shots. I am usually using the 18mm wide-range side when I take a lot of landscapes and parties in tight spaces. The zoom ring is pretty smooth and turns fast with your finger. The new line of Sony lenses is labeled SAM which constantly autofocuses whereever you point your camera. You can essentially make this a point-and-shoot camera, you don’t have to look at the viewfinder and know you’ll get a clear image. You hear some mechanical noise when it focuses, but I’ve never thought it to be a problem anywhere.

    There is a barrel distortion effect at 18mm but is barely noticeable. It has almost no distortions at 55mm. If you are thinking about getting a super-zoom like 18-250, they have huge optical distortions. This is why I prefer to stitch shorter-range zooms instead. Prime lenses will give you the best quality, but changing lenses constantly can really bog you down.
    For an amateur photographer but also cares about the quality of the pictures, this lens will do. I noticed chromatic abberration when I was taking pictures in a canyon. It was tricky because of the high contrast between bright sky and dark cave. If you know where to look for chromatic aberration, it’s time to upgrade to a better lens. If you don’t wanna be a professional but want pictures that will wow your friends, then this lens is for you.

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